fallingbooks: (yarn)
I've been thinking and what I really want is a monthly sock yarn club that is just yarn. That's it. 400+ yards of a surprise club exclusive colorway (on something dense like the RSC base,) with no patterns that I will never use and no cutesy extras that I do not need. Plain, simple, $20-25 a month price range.

Does such a thing even exist? Because I have not found it yet, and I really miss getting a monthly does of something woolen in the mail.

Blerg.

Jan. 19th, 2011 12:14 am
fallingbooks: (Default)
I have a toe mostly worked up for a sock in nice but uninspiring yarn. (At the moment. It's a dreary navy blue tonal with some dye breaks - goes oddly lavender in places, slushy charcoal in others. It may be more inspiring yarn when everything isn't so grey out.I may rip it out and start something new as an alternate travel project but honestly, I've got so many WiPs on needles I have trouble picking one to focus on. I know what my problem is - I want to so everything at once and somehow expect it to be magically finished within a week - somehow ignoring the fact that 4 rows can take me an hour to complete. ::rolls eyes:: I need to buckle down and focus.

--

I HAVE been spinning a bit lately. Hopefully there will be some washing and whacking this weekend and I'll have some pics. I haven't really been feeling the spinning thing this winter, but I think that's because I'm avoiding a project I started - about a pound of tightly curled cormo mix roving. I do not like spinning it, Sam I Am. I do not like it as top or batt, or having been slept on by my cat. I do not like it in the fresh air, hell, I do not like it anywhere. I'm not sure if it's how it's been processed, or is it's too sproingy, or too lanolin-y or what, but I just dread working with the stuff.(which isn't to say cormo doesn't make lovely yarn that I'd be happy to knit with, just, y'know, not when it's made with my hands.) BUT! I will finish it eventually because, well, I'm stubborn like that.

--

If you are a fellow Ravelry junkie, you've probably heard by now that Remnants, the ridiculously sprawling Big 6 forum dedicated to whatever ravellers had on the brain that day is kaput. Done, dead, finito! Personally, I'm not sad to see it go and I'm all for whatever makes the site easier for TPTB to run, but I am sympathetic to the folks who hung out there regularly. It's know fun when your Internet watering hole up and vanishes. Been there, got the mousepad. RIP Remrants, you were something else.
fallingbooks: (finished)
High on the list of things I freaking know I own but cannot find is my 40" size 8 circular. I was hoping to take another crack at ye olde Cecchetti of Doooom (because my office is freakin' freezing and the alpaca yarn I'm gonna use is warm, but alas, it's not meant to be. Today, anyway.

mittensKnitpicks, here I come!

(Pictures for like, the last paragraph, ahoy. I tried to get all arty with them. ::rolls eyes::))

Anyway, in lieu of that, I'm going to cast on a Yvonne using some of the Noro Yuzen I bought earlier this year. (I bought WAAAAAAAAAY too much of the stuff. Not sure what I was thinking there.) Anyway, I love this pattern, but I'm a bit conflicted about my love because it's basically a fancy-ass vest, and I am not so much about those. (I find that my boobtacularness is best showcased by tasteful cleavage, not so much a large swath of contrasting color.) But it's cold and I have all the pieces and parts to make something comfy so I'm trying to to worry about it so much. I'll keep you posted on my progress, Internets.

Itty mittensAnyway, real and valuable content! I have finished things! Many and several, in fact. But today we're gonna talk about mittens.

Made with Cascade 220 superwash and Ella Rae superwash. I'm not a huge fan of superwash for mittens because I like it when they felt a bit as part of regular use (makes for a warmer/drier mitten IMHO,) but sometimes, particularly when you're talking kids who are more apt to get them dirty, superwash is the better choice for ease of care. I'm building a recipe pattern for these as I'm getting pretty good at sizing them from kid-sized up to very, very large, and will hopefully have that available for folks before the end of the year.

Needled

Dec. 1st, 2010 09:23 pm
fallingbooks: piles of books and yarn (fallingbooks)
I don't know about you, but I'm a picky knitter. As the budget allows, I favor natural fibers over man-made, saturated colors over pastels, multi-ply over single ply, local and indie over commercial. I've got it pretty sorted as to what I look for in a yarn, and I have my favorites. Where I'm having issues these days is in the area of needles.

(In an ideal world, I would have an endless supply of brightly colored vintage Bakelite or Lucite needles at my disposal, in all sorts of shapes, sizes and configurations. I like the translucent ones best, but I once had a pair of opaque tealy-turquoise ones I loved and miss terribly. Plastics are my all time favorite. Slick, but not slippery. Pointy, but not painfully so. Clicky, but quiet. Flexible. Warm. Colorful. I tend to horde them, snatching up everything I can afford when I find them at flea markets or tag sales, but they're still a somewhat limited commodity.)

At the moment I'm trying to find the perfect DPNs for socks. I DO have plastics that would suit - I favor 2.25mm needles - but I clutch my needles so tightly when I'm knitting socks that it's inevitable that they snap. I mean, when I was using bamboo, I would destroy at least one needle per sock and put a permanent curve into the rest of them. They ended up being a very costly option, seeing as I pretty much needed to buy a new set every other pair of socks to compensate for the damaged needles. I've avoided wooden needles for pretty much the same reason. (Plus, they're even more expensive.)

Right now I'm using Kollage squares because they look nifty and I don't seem to bend them quite as badly. I'm not sure if it's the square shape, or the materials they're made of, but I'm three pairs in on these needles and they're all still relatively straight. They'd be perfect except for the fact that the copper-colored coating wears off the tips with the first sock you make. I've used multiple sizes and they all do this to some degree. Another small annoyance is that the etched brand and size information the side of the needle (which is a neat idea, total props for the concept,) tends to create drag on your yarn. I do love the squareness of the needles, though, and my hands don't tire as quickly using them, so they may be on to something with all this ergonomicness they've got going on. In general, I'm pretty happy, and the price point is reasonable (around $12ish for a set of five 6" size 1s.)

A couple high-end knitting needles brands have popped up in the last year adding to the array of sock needles available. I think by now most people who tend to spend their time perusing Vogue Knitting and Ravelry have probably heard of Signature - pretty silver and jewel-toned needles that come in multiple lengths, points, and configurations. People who've gotten their hands on their beauties rave about them like they're a religious experience, emphasizing the smoothness of the knit and the pointiness of the needles. Me, I find myself going "Ooh, that green is so pretty. So. Pretty." (I'm kinda shallow like that.)

Blackthornes appear to be a relatively new brand, but seem to be gaining a following. They're a carbon fiber needle that seems to promise everything my plastics would - warmth, flexibility, and slickness without the fear of snappage. They're definitely appealing to me in a way that the metal needles can't.

Unfortunately what's less appealing about the both of them is their price. Both companies run in the $40 range for a set of DPNs. I am not saying that this isn't a fair price for artisan materials, which I think these are. What I am saying is that I have a lot of trouble plunking down that kind of money, sight unseen, return policy or no, for something I myself haven't handled and may not figure out the durability of until I'm on my second pair of socks three months down the line. I mean, how quickly do the ends blunt? If I toss them in my bag, will they get all nicked up? (Note: Kollages hold up pretty well to the purse test unless they get really up close and personal with your keys in a tight pocket. Alas, my poor little size 0s, I knew you well.) Are they going to be crescent-shaped after the toe of my first sock? It's one thing if I can get 10+ pairs of socks off of a set before I decide they need to be retired, it's another if it's two pairs.

I think what I'm hoping is that the Blackthornes turn up at a local festival or shop so I can manhandle them myself. I worry about how they'll handle more than than the Signatures (a metal needle is a metal needle, allowing for some variation in slickness, tensile strength, length, and pointiness,) because I'm not clear on exactly how they'll feel in my hands, and it seems, based on the discussions in the Ravelry Blackthorne group, that they're still working out some of their growing pains with regard to needle development. Maybe if they make it to Rhinebeck next year and I get to play with a set for a bit, I'll be persuaded to part with some of my fiber funds. I think I'd like to give them some time to settle into a groove before I get serious about them as a possibility. Also, they don't have the 2.25mm size yet. It limits the temptation.

The green Signatures, though... Christmas is coming, right?
fallingbooks: piles of books and yarn (fallingbooks)
...finishing a pair of sock that you IMMEDIATELY need to shove them onto your feet for admiring purposes?
fallingbooks: (yarn)
Yarn swap! Sign-ups through the 30th.

(As mentioned in this morning's 'this is why Dreamwidth is fabulous' post.)

Currently still prodding at a set off mittens which should be done by the weekend and mailed off Monday. I hope to have a decent FO roundup by the end of next week.

Preggers

Nov. 24th, 2010 08:32 pm
fallingbooks: piles of books and yarn (fallingbooks)
No, not me. It appears that I am to be an auntie.

Once I picked my jaw up off the floor, (An auntie? Really? ALREADY? I'm only...mumbletymumble... Huh.) I started digging through Ravelry for patterns.

At the moment I'm working with the specifications of 1.) it's a girl, 2.) no pink, and 3.) don't even think about skully hoodies. I am somewhat saddened by the last point, but at least the sibling said nothing about space invaders. (Mind, I didn't exactly ask, either. What she doesn't know...will possibly hurt me in the end, but will totally be worth it.)

ANYWAY. The only thing I know I'm making right now are duck feet. Yarn has been ordered, pattern has been printed, and Auntie Sarah is at the ready with her needles. But what the hell else should I make? Sweaters? Dresses? Socks? I'm kind of stumped, especially as we'll be getting into spring when she's born (which is still cold, so not a total loss, but.) I used to babysit. I remember how fast kids grow. She'll probably be wearing 6x by the fall, knowing my family.

Anyone have any favorite patterns or pattern books they can recommend?
fallingbooks: (yarn)
I went. I saw. I observed a mass quantity of Ravellers from a relatively safe distance. I stood outside the Bosworth booth and gazed in at the shinies longingly. I shopped.

I will spare you the majority of the details. It was nice seeing the friends that I did, and I hope to see the ones that I missed next year.

(Someday, double-treadle Journey wheel! Someday you will be mine!)

(Possibly in 2013.)

(And maybe after I get a DT Matchless, seeing as the bug is already pretty portable. Regardless, IT WILL HAPPEN!)

(Man, I am just one great big covety mess, huh?)

blingpacaMy big splurgey purchase this year was 8oz of lovely, creamy blingpaca from Loop. I've been ogling it on Etsy for a while and when confronted with coveted itm face-to-face I simply had to have it. I'm looking forward to spinning it a whole lot, once I get through the holiday season and get a few other projects off my plate and wheel. I love alpaca, and prefer to spin from top as opposed to bats or roving for smoothness, and, yes, I love sparkle, so this really hits all the markers for being 'Something Sarah Likes.' I'm not sure what I'm going to do with it yet, but preliminary thoughts run along the lines of 2-ply fingering weight knit up as a stole. 


Innit pretty?

I bought some other stuff, too. I've got some lovely blue romney from Jersey, a camel-colored ball of llama that I am like 17 different kinds of excited about, some skeins of yarn, and this:

BMFA STR Rhinebeck2010 RareGem It's a Blue Moon STR lightweight Rare Gem. Photographing it and putting it up on needles was literally the first thing I did when I got home with it. It's absolutely gorgeous and I get a woodsy vibe off of the colors. It's probably my favorite thing I bought aside from the blingpaca. The Fold is something I look forward to every year at Rhinebeck. I don't always get something, but I love the opportunity to look at everything and see the colors first hand in the morning light. (And yes, also to ravage the Rare Gem rack. I have a Rare Gem problem.)

Oh, why is it only once a year? (Probably because I'd be broke otherwise.)

It lives!

Nov. 2nd, 2010 11:07 pm
fallingbooks: (yarn)
I am not dead! And my elbow is (mostly) functional again! Frabjous day!

Unfortunately, we are in the heart of mitten season, so that's pretty much the bulk of my projects through December. I'm on the hook for at least three pairs, plus matching hats for two of the sets. If I can figure out how to make that exciting, you will hear it here first.

ANYway, regular service will resume shortly, as soon as I can get some decent pictures of my Rhinebeck spoils and the various other things I've gotten up to during my badly behaved, quasi convalescence.

(I dyed! It was a disaster! But fun!)
fallingbooks: (Default)
I'm probably going to be a bit quiet for the next couple weeks as I have apparently given myself a bit of tennis elbow and have to be a little careful with it .

(Mom: How'd you do that?
Me: Knitting?
Mom: ::muffled laughter::)

Never fear, we'll be back soon enough with all sorts of tales about Sarah's adventures in mistranslating charts and her ever expanding to-do queue.
fallingbooks: (Default)
Okay, I tried to post about my 2 Week Sweater yesterday and it got eaten and my heart was broken and the world was ending so I went off to mope and spin some SAL fiber for the rest of the evening. Let us all hope that this goes better this time.

(The post, not the sweater. It's still in a completely unnommed state as far as I know. Maybe I should go check...)

ditz inna damariscotta (my god I hate having my picture taken.)SO! I finished my sweater at midnight on Saturday morning, and almost a week later I'm still wandering around in a state of shock. I. Made a sweater. Holy freaking crap, I made a SWEATER. In LESS THAN TWO WEEKS.

(In case it hadn't clicked, I'd never made a sweater before. Sweaters were big and scary and had seams, dear God, SEAMS. Only really good knitters made sweaters.)

I honestly feel like I can take over the entire world right now, clad in my fiefdom conquering sweater and despot crushing socks. My ego is now immense and my self esteem is insanely high. I had a huge mental block and this project helped me vault right over it and now all I want to do is make sweaters. Lots of them. Right now. No, seriously. RightNow. If for no other reason than that, the project was a success, but it turns out that despite my yarn-subbing, modifying shenanigans, the sweater is surprisingly wearable as well. Huzzah!

Deets:

Pattern:
Damariscotta from the Spring 2010 Twist Collective
Yarn: Stitch Nation Full O' Sheep in Mediterranean
Needles: KnitPicks Zephyr Interchangeables, size 6 and random sz 5s (DPN + straights)

Starting at the bottom of the list -- I decided to test drive the Zephyrs on this project. (I needed to get a size 6 circular, anyway.) I have a longstanding love of vintage plastics, (and also a longstanding history of accidentally snapping them, whoops,) so I've always been intrigued by them. Can I say, these needles are seriously awesome? I could get all pretentious and talk about handfeel and flexibility, but the bottom line is they're nicely slick so that your yarn moves over them easily, and they have the warmth and give that I've come to expect from using the vintage needles all while being pretty darn cheap. I'll definitely be adding more of these to the collection.

The yarn, however... this just wasn't the right project for it, for me personally. I had it kicking around in the right quantity and didn't want to go buy the recommended yarn (because I am lazy, and there tends to be a dearth of decent cottons around here,) so I totally take ownership for my decision. That said, the yarn halos like mad, and when I say 'like mad' I'm not indulging in hyperbole to talk about the little bit of fluff that you get on knitted objects after a couple careful wearings. No. I'm talking, 'holy crap, this looks like a carpet after a 3 am catfight between some seriously aggravated persians' before the darn thing was even worn. (Okay, maybe THAT'S a bit of an exaggeration, but not too much!) I was simply shocked by how much it haloed knitting it up, considering how smooth it looks in the skein. Me, I'm not a huge fan of fuzzy sweaters. Scarves, hats, shawls, fine. Sweaters, no. YMMV. The color is lovely and even, however, and it is fabulously warm.

I love the pattern. I'll probably use it as a base for a fistful of other sweaters. The directions are clear and concise, comes in a variety of sizes, and it's easily moddable to adapt to your personal wants. Personal mods: lowered the neckline by 8 rows (still legal, but will layer better over some of my other tops,) subbed in 6 rows of seed stitch, bound off in pattern for the rolled hems on the arms, and 8 rows, split at the side seams for the bottom hem. The main things I'll probably do the next time is tinker with the decreases coming out of the bust, and add an extra one for a slightly snugger fit, and not move to a smaller needle for the hems.

I'm thinking a slightly longer body with long sleeves that switch to a complimentary color at the elbow for the next one.

---

In spinning news, I currently have two SALs on tap. The ITW one needs to be completed, um, soon, (It went on the wheel last night!) but the Fiber Fancy batts arrived yesterday (accompanied by Laffy Taffy and candy buttons!) so I think I'll put them aside and work on them as part of the Tour de Fleece insanity.

(I may have a poll on what I should work on for TdF this weekend, because I seem to have acquired quite a bit of fluff, and my decision making capabilities are a bit overwhelmed by all of it. It does not help that I essentially have no plan for any of it.)

--

Into The Whirled SAL fiber - Inspirations 'Starcrossed' & 'Teal'


itw-starcrossedITW - Teal

--

Fiber Fancy SAL fiber - Wonka 'Fizzy Lifting Drinks'

fiber fancy - fizzy lifting drink

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I'm thinking about including some book reviews and whatnot on this blog. I used to maintain a yearly list of new books I'd read and some capsule reviews elsewhere, but let it lapse about a year ago, but I'm starting to feel love again. I read mostly urban fantasy, romance, graphic novels, and gobs of YA, as an fyi/fair warning. ;)
fallingbooks: (dyeing)

Dye kit - WHOO!
MUAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
Hopefully I'll get something going this weekend. :)
(Note to self: Go steal H's microwave.)






















fallingbooks: Schact Ladybug #51! (spinning)
First off: SUCCESS! I finished the sweater in the week smalls of Saturday morning (possibly fueled by some boxed riesling,) and will try to get some pictures and notes up about it later in the week. I gotta wash and block it first. Which reminded me:

I bought a couple bags of unwashed alpaca (gorgeous natural greys and blacks, which are my favorite,) at  a show this year and decided that in order to have it ready for the Tour de Fleece, I needed to wash that sucker asap. I have a pound of it, and I have plans to get through it and about a pound of other miscelleaneous pretties while watching Dr. Who avidly.

(I admit, I am not so much into bicycling races as I am into having an excuse to be single-minded about a project for a set period of time. I am on teams Tardis and ITW on Rav.  Join us!)

(Incidentally, I now have 'Doctor, doctor, gimme the news' rattling around my head.)

I had no idea the sheer amount of ick that would come out of this stuff. Oh. My. Unspecified Deity. I threw a few ounces in a large mesh laundry bag and started rinsing it out with a little shampoo and I'm quite frankly not sure my tub will ever recover from this. As it stands it's still not perfectly clean, but it's good enough that I should be able work with it without watching the ick build up on my hands in horror.

I think this may cure me of my fleece-lust, at least until a get a bigger place (and a scrub sink) to work on this stuff in.

On the other hand, I now desperately want a drum carder and some silver angelina.

It's always something. ;)

--
Edit: Alpaca with his own personal wading pool. Very funny.
fallingbooks: (Default)
Damaricotta - 75%!
I CAN SEE THE LIGHT!

I'm almost done with the body, only another 20 rows or so, and then I can attack the sleeves. While I am am optimistic about getting this done on time, I also have to remember that I have guests coming this weekend and well, one must be polite, even in the face of looming deadlines.

The Plan:
  • Finish the Damariscotta
  • Finish the FLS
  • Finish the current section of my current citron
  • Contemplate casting on the Alice. But not before all of the above is completed. The Damariscotta, at the very least.
fallingbooks: (yarn)
I am cruising along nicely and having finished the bust decreases, I slipped it off the needles and tried it on (no pictures because I lowered the neckline to make it a better layering piece for the fall and I don't really feel the need to flash the Internet,) and I am 1.) in love, and 2.) still basking in that OMG IT'S A SWEATER euphoria. Brace yourselves, I think it's going to go on for a while yet. I seriously added at least 20 sweater patterns to my queue. I'll try to get a picture of it again towards the end of the week.

--

I went through my yarn bin this afternoon and pulled out a bunch off odds and ends - single skeins that I ought without a plan, multiple skeins where I've decided that the original plan sucks, and am destashing them. They're up on Ravelry with pics, if anyone is interested in taking a look. I need to clean house and this has the added benefit of putting a couple bucks into the new computer jar.

--

In case it's not evident, I like Ravelry quite a bit. I'm not a huge chatter on the boards, although I belong to a zillion groups, but I really think that their project, stash and pattern management tools are excellent. The project pages keep me honest with what's on the needles and what I'm ignoring, the stash pages help me keep track of what I actually have (both in that I don't buy unnecessary dupes and also that I actually have enough yarn in my stash to pull off a particular pattern,) and the pattern pages help me keep tabs on patterns I actually want to make. It really is an invaluable resource for me. I'd be quite lost with out it.

--

I am test driving some Knitpicks zephyr interchangeables. I think I like them, although I don't know they're any less 'clicky' than my metal Addis are.

--

Rubenesque ladies! The current issue of Verena has some very nice sweaters in it in our sizes.(Ignore all of the eye-searingly bright sweaters with (imho) alarming colorwork. It's like dayglo hell in there.) It's well worth the price of picking up a paper copy if a few of them catch your eye. I probably will end up making at least a couple of the non-ribby ones.
fallingbooks: piles of books and yarn (fallingbooks)
Also, have you guys seen this? It's like Woot for yarn. SO addictive to watch.

http://www.jimmybeanswool.com/secure-html/onlineec/woolWatcher.asp
fallingbooks: (yarn)
Hi, my name is Sarah, and I'm out of my freakin' mind.

I follow the Twist Collective on Twitter. And Twist Collective Kate who tweets, has issued a challenge: she has to knit up a sweater in two weeks, so why not see who else can do it.

Me, being a complete nutcase with a penchant for starting new projects, leapt on the project like it was made of coffee Timtams. (Which is to say, rabidly.)

I cast on a Damariscotta last night using Stitch Nation sheep in Mediterranean. I was wondering how it knits up. (The answer: Halo-y.) I'll try to check in with this project regularly so you can place bets for when the breakdown happens.

Damariscotta - In Progress

---

In the meantime, I would like to offer proof that I do occasionally finish projects. I present my Emerald Starling stole, in a 2 ply fingering weight Romney I spun up. I really liked this pattern for hand spun, particularly the semi-stripey because it really shows off the yarn while adding some visual interest to the piece with the lacey cross sections.

frank's shawlfrank's shawl

Fiber Fancy - Mustard and Herbs

YARN DIET.

Jun. 6th, 2010 09:14 pm
fallingbooks: (yarn)
I took a good hard look at my stash the other day. It is not a small stash, and although I don't have to stuff yarn into the arms of winter jackets or other out-of-season clothing to hide it from an SO, I do have a tendency to shove as much of it as possible out of sight when I know Non-Yarn-People will be coming to visit. I have a bin of fiber the cat could go swimming in and I'd never notice.

It's getting bad, y'all. And Rhinebeck is only four months away.

(Oh, you THINK that's plenty of time, but no. No, it's really not.)

Anyway, I was looking at the stash and realized that I have to do something about it before I bring anything else in. Some of it is up on Rav right now for sale. Mostly the odds and ends of things that I bought on impulse with no real plan at the time and 6-24 months later, I'm still lacking one. I also signed up for a spinning fiber stashdown in July. I am going to spin the living daylights out of my stash. Or at least some of it. Definitely parts of it. Every little bit helps, right? It may not minimize the stash that much in terms of actual fiber content, but sheer fluffy volume has to count for something!

I am also going to knit sweaters. I have been been meaning to for a while and avoiding it like the plague, but a week or so ago I finally got up the gumption to make the ubiquitous February Lady Sweater like I'd been meaning to for the last year and a half, and you know what? Sweaters aren't all that scary. (Says the girl who just frogged about 33% of a Cecchetti because she screwed up a count somewhere. Oops!) I've queued up a bunch of cardigans, but there's not a whole lot of pullovers that I've found appealing. I'm thinking I may have to figure out how one of the various raglan generators work.

(If anyone has any recs in this area for patterns - I don't care if they're not free - I'm looking for a wide boat or scoop/sweetheart/square with cap or full-length sleeves and a long body...and a 50"-52" bust. Designers ARE getting better about including larger sizes (Mostly. If they're indie. ::scowls at Ella Rae and Louisa Harding, among others:: It's not my fault I'm 6'0" and busty!) so I'm not going to complain overmuch. It's killer when you find THE. Perfect. Pattern. And it stops at a 44" in bust, though.)

And finally, (back to the original topic,) there will be no more buying of yarn until Rhinebeck. I will refrain from acquiring anything other than what I've got coming in from the club. I will stand fast against wooly temptation! I will shop the stash! I AM ON A YARN DIET.

(Unless I get forcibly dragged to Webs against my will and find glorious charcoally grey worsted alpaca shoved into my hands with the instruction that an angora bunny will die for every second that I stand there with it unbought. Because clearly at that point it was meant to be. Think of the bunnies!)

I am a tower of strength and willpower.
fallingbooks: (Default)
survival shawl - simple Right after Christmas last year my LYS had a major sale on EVERYTHING and having a fat, new gift certificate burning a hole in my pocket, I indulged. On everything. One of the things I ended up carting home was an obscene amount of silk garden that I had vague, shawl-like aspirations for.

(I have vague, shawl-like aspirations for a lot of things. This is an ongoing trend that I have no doubt will crop up repeatedly here.)

In any event, it sat here spliced into a beach ball of continuous color runs for months while I tried to figure out what to do with it. Finally, faced with a few consecutive days of meeting and no help for my sanity in sight, I said screw it, pulled out ye olde stitch library and cobbled together a quickie pattern that not only would turn my beach ball into something pretty AND useful, but also would enable me to survive the next few days with my marbles intact.

I think it turned out fairly well. I apologize for the lack of action shots, I'll see if I can coerce coax any of my usual models into helping out later in the week. Pattern after the jump. Question, do people find it more useful to have this sort of thing put together as a PDF for download, or just tucked away on a web page?

Survival Stole )

If you try this pattern, please let me know if there are and corrections or clarifications that need to be included. :) Thanks!

---

ETA: Added to Ravelry for um, vanity and increased exposure. (ZOUNDS, I AM A DESIGNER.)
fallingbooks: piles of books and yarn (fallingbooks)
I belong to a couple of yarn/fiber clubs. The idea being that you pay a set amount (I prefer the monthly pay-as-you-go ones, but most of them tend to be lump sum payments for spans of anywhere from three months to a year,) and you get a surprise package of yarn/fiber and accessories that are valued at x percent of your payment. Right now I'm in two sock yarn clubs and a fiber club.

I think they are in concept great things. Good for stash building, wonderful monthly surprises (if you don't know what you signed up for,) usually a decent bang for your buck, but they're also something of an 'I have money to burn' or 'I am extreeeeeeeeemely flexible about my knitting' kind of luxury. I don't know that I fall quite in either category at the moment.

For example, I love that my fiber club uses all kinds of different wools to send things out on. I probably wouldn't have tried Shetland as readily and I quite love it thanks to the club. But I don't know if I've just hit a bum run or what, but the last 3 our of four shipments just have not appealed to me. They were on fibers I already know (and have too much of) or they were colors that were decidedly not me, or both. I think that's a sign I need to drop that club, at least for the time being. I'm also getting a little control freak about my spinning and have very decided ideas about what I want to spend my time creating right now.

One sock club ends this month so while it's been fun, I'm glad I don't have to worry about re-upping. The other sock club I quite like as there's always at least two color options to pick from and the bases are delightful, except it's a little expensive because we get a pattern every month for socks. They're LOVELY patterns. Very intricate, very pretty. HOWEVER. I am pretty sure, based on my socky experiences, that they're are not going to fit my feet as written, and the really figural ones will not be (easily) adaptable. I'm not sure what I want to do about this one. There are sister clubs I can slip into to get the same colorways, but they're not quite the same with regard to yarn bases. I'm still mulling it over. I've only recently join and am still trying out their different bases, so I may hang in a little while longer before making any major moves. The club colors have been delightful the last few months, and I can always use the patterns for socks for other people.

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I'm currently in a knitting phase at the moment with a couple shawls, a pair of socks, and a sweater on the needles at the moment. I'll post up pictures and pattern links when I get a bit further along.
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